THE USE OF RING VACCINATION TO CONTROL MONKEYPOX OUTBREAK IN THE SOCIETY. PCC Global Health June 23, 2022

THE USE OF RING VACCINATION TO CONTROL MONKEYPOX OUTBREAK IN THE SOCIETY.

Monkey pox is closely related to smallpox. People who received a smallpox vaccine in the past may have some protection from monkey pox. (The US smallpox vaccination program was discontinued in 1972, and smallpox was declared eradicated worldwide in 1980.)

Ring vaccination

Monkeypox differs from the virus that causes COVID-19. People with monkeypox usually have symptoms when they’re contagious, and the number of infected persons is usually limited.

This means it’s possible to vaccinate a “ring” of people around them rather than vaccinating an entire population. This selective approach is called ring vaccination.

Ring vaccination has been used successfully to contain smallpox and Ebola outbreaks. It may come in handy for monkey pox as well. Here’s how it works:

As soon as a case of monkey pox is suspected or confirmed, the patient and their close contacts are interviewed to identify possible exposures.

Vaccination is offered to all close contacts.

Vaccination is also offered to those who had close contact with the infected person’s contacts.

Ideally, people should be vaccinated within four days of exposure.

This approach requires widespread awareness of monkey pox, rapid isolation of suspected cases, and an efficient contact tracing system. And of course, vaccines must be available whenever and wherever new cases arise.

Are the vaccines used for monkey pox effective?

According to the CDC, the smallpox vaccine is 85% effective against monkey pox.

While a newer vaccine (JYNNEOS) directed against monkey pox and smallpox has only been tested for effectiveness in animals, it is also expected to be highly effective in humans.

In light of the current monkey pox outbreak, you may soon be hearing more about ring vaccination. Then again, if appropriate measures are taken to prevent its spread, this outbreak may soon be over. Either way, this won’t be the last time an unusual virus shows up seemingly out of the blue in unexpected places. Climate change, shrinking animal habitats, rising global animal trade, and increasing international travel mean that it’s only a matter of time before this happens again.

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